Vinegar is an inexpensive, healthy way to clean and disinfect your home.

Cleaning drains: Pour 1/2 cup baking soda in the drain, followed by 1/2 cup vinegar; the mixture will foam as it cleans and deodorizes. Use every few weeks to keep drains clean.

Mildew on plastic shower curtains: Put the shower curtain in the washing machine with light-colored towels; add 1 cup white vinegar to the detergent and wash.

Soap scum on shower: Spray on vinegar, scrub and rinse.

Toilet hard-water rings: Shut off water at the tank and flush to remove as much water as possible. Spray vinegar on the ring, sprinkle in borax and scrub with drywall sandpaper.

Shower head deposits: Pour white vinegar into a plastic bag, tape to the shower head and leave overnight. Brush the shower head to remove remaining deposits.

Softening laundry: Fill dispenser with 1/4 cup white vinegar to soften laundry without leaving odors.

Cleaning vinyl floors: Add 1/4 cup vinegar to 1 gallon hot water for spotless floors.

Cleaning windows: Mix 50 percent white vinegar with 50 percent water in a spray bottle. Spray glass surfaces and wipe dry.

Neutralize pet odors: Mix 1 part white vinegar to 3 parts water. Pour on stained areas and blot; never rub to remove stains and odors.

Greasy dishes: Mix 2 tablespoons white vinegar to liquid dish soap to boost its cleaning power.

If you have any other ways you use vinegar, please let us know in the comments section! The more the better!


Dr. Jeffrey Manning, DC

Manning Wellness Clinic

2702 McKinney Avenue, suite 202

Dallas, TX 75204


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Staying Healthy with Chiropractic: All Germs are Not Created Equal

We’ve been taught by our mothers, and our mothers by their mothers, and so on, and so on, and so on: Wash your hands! But I remember, and it wasn’t too, too long ago, when as a kid, straight from the playground, dirt under the nails, I’d eat my lunch. We didn’t use hand sanitizers at every turn, and we seemed to do just fine. I’m not saying hand washing is not important–it is–but there can be a limit and we have to keep in mind that our bodies, when healthy, can put up quite a fight. The following article from Parenting really says it all:


It’s understandable that parents want to keep their children’s environments clean, especially when kids are young. Moms wash bottles in hot water, clean pacifiers that fall on the ground, and take dirty things out of their kids’ mouths. But overall, when it comes to germs, most people have it backward: With relatively few exceptions, they are good for our kids. Keeping things clean is smart, but going crazy using antibacterial hand soaps, buying antibacterial kids’ toys and other products, and overusing antibiotic medications is actually killing off the microbes that can help strengthen the immune system. Antibacterial products may help to reduce some infections, but they also promote the growth of drug-resistant organisms and weaken the good bacteria within us. Rather than focus on killing germs, we need to think about how to encourage their growth.

Supporting the “right” bacteria can have a huge health payoff for your kids: fewer ear infections, tummy aches, episodes of diarrhea, urinary-tract infections, and food allergies. It can even help kids fight off coughs, colds, and fevers. Here’s how to ensure your kids have enough of the good stuff:

Feed your kids right. Give them foods that naturally contain helpful organisms. These include yogurt, pickles, dark chocolate, and feta cheese. In some cases , it may be useful to give a probiotic supplement (available at most pharmacies and health-food stores) containing beneficial live bacteria. All of these foods and supplements are fine to give kids starting at around 6 months. There are other foods to include in their diet that don’t actually contain good germs but help to nurture them: garlic, onions, asparagus, whole oats, whole wheat, honey (for children over age 1), and bananas.

Make safe and smart choices. Keep your kids away from cigarette smoke; exposure can kill off favorable bacteria. As for antibiotic drugs, don’t insist that your pediatrician prescribe them when he says they’re not necessary. These drugs eliminate both good and bad bacteria. If your kids do have to take antibiotics, make sure they get probiotics, too, to restore the body’s supply of good bacteria.

Keeping the body’s bacteria in balance doesn’t take a lot of effort, but it can have big benefits. Starting these habits young can help keep kids healthy for life.