8 Foods that Fight Pain

Before reaching for a bottle of painkillers, try adding some of these 8 Foods that Fight Pain to your diet.

Other than just great taste, there are foods that have the ability to fight pain and reduce inflammation. Dallas chiropractor, Dr. Jeff Manning, says that adding these foods to your diet, especially combined with chiropractic care, can help your body to heal more quickly. “Foods can greatly affect inflammation in the body; some artificial sweeteners can add to or increase inflammation, while other foods like ginger can do the exact opposite,” says chiropractor Jeff Manning of Manning Wellness Clinic in Dallas.

The following is a great list of 8 Foods that Fight Pain. You don’t need to, nor should you, try to add all at once, but trying one at a time will help you determine which work best for you.

And, according to Greatist.com, the winners are….

8 Natural Foods to Eat for Pain Relief

Whether it’s residual aches from an exceptionally tough workout, the beginnings of a pesky cold, or waking up on the wrong side of the bed, some research suggests supplementing those pain pills with certain foods could be just as helpful.

Believe it or not, those healthy fruits, veggies, and whole grains we try to pack in our diets may do more than just feed our bodies well — many of them are considered to have anti-inflammatory properties. Sometimes inflammation is a good thing, we’ll give you that — it protects our body when we’ve been injured — but it can also be painful. (Think asthma and arthritis, inflamed sore throats, and cuts or scrapes.) While some have linked [1] certain foods (including chocolate, eggs, wheat, meat, and corn) to causing inflammation, there’s also evidence that a few select delectables could help prevent it, too ((Dietary strategies for improving post-prandial glucose, lipids, inflammation, and cardiovascular health [2]. O’Keefe, J.H., Gheewala, N.M., O’Keefe, J.O. Mid America Heart Institute and University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2008 Jan 22;51(3):249-55. )). Here are eight foods that research suggests may actually help reduce pain.

ginger

1. Ginger. Ginger [3] is basically a wonder root. It combats nausea and motion sickness, and fights off pain with itsanti-inflammatory [4] properties ((Ginger — an herbal medicinal product with broad anti-inflammatory actions [5]. Grzanna R., Lindmark L., Frondoza C.G., RMG Biosciences, Inc. Journal of Medicinal Food, 2005 Summer;8(2):125-32.)). Some especially great news for the ladies: One study showed that ginger (specifically in the form of a 250g or 500g capsule of powdered ginger) was as effective as ibuprofen in relieving menstrual pain ((Comparison of effects of ginger, mefenamic acid, and ibuprofen on pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea. [6] Ozgoli G., Goli M., Moattar F., Nursing and Midwifery School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2009 Feb;15(2):129-32.))! Plus, ginger can be ingested a variety of ways, from supplements, to tea and cookies [7], to stir fry [8].

 salmon

 

2. Salmon. Not only is salmon tasty and a healthy protein, but it’s full of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to reduce arthritic pain (especially in the neck and back) ((Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) as an anti-inflammatory: an alternative to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for discogenic pain. [9], Maroon J.C., Bost J.W., Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Surgical Neurololgy, 2006 Apr;65(4):326-31.)). In one study, the relief experienced from consuming omega-3s in the form of a fish oil supplement was comparable to the relief experienced from taking ibuprofen. Chow down on some of those omega-3s with this baked salmon with avocado yogurt sauce [10] tonight.

 coffee

 

3. Coffee. Just one more excuse to grab that second cup of Joe! Research suggests caffeine can reduce pain in those suffering from exercise-induced muscular injury and pain ((Caffeine attenuates delayed-onset muscle pain and force loss following eccentric exercise. [11] Maridakis V., O’Connor P.J., Dudley G.A., et. al. Department of Kinesiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-6554, USA. Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society, 2007 Mar;8(3):237-43.)). Not only that, when taken with a standard dose of pain reliever (ibuprofen, for example), one study found that a 100mg to 130mg caffeine supplement — equal to about the amount of caffeine in one cup of coffee —  increased pain relief ((Caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant for acute pain in adults. [12], Derry C.J., Derry S., Moore R.A., Pain Research and Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Nuffield Division of Anaesthetics), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Cochrane Database Systematic Review, 2012 Mar 14;3:CD009281.)).

echinacea

4. Echinacea and Sage. Got an aching throat? Some research shows that throat sprays containing sage or echinacea can help provide relief from that nasty sore throat ((Echinacea/sage or chlorhexidine/lidocaine for treating acute sore throats: a randomized double-blind trial., [13] Schapowal A., Berger D., Klein P., Suter A., Allergy Clinic, CH-7302 Landquart, Switzerland. European Journal of Medical Research, 2009 Sep 1;14(9):406-12.)), though there have been few other studies on this benefit, so the evidence isn’t hulk strong [14]. Another survey looking at 14 different studies found that echinacea [15] can decrease the number of cold infections caught, and reduce their durations ((Evaluation of echinacea for the prevention and treatment of the common cold: a meta-analysis. [16] Shah S.A., Sander S., White C.M., University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Storrs, CT. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2007 Jul;7(7):473-80.)). Sage is easy to find at most grocery stores and is also especially tasty in any of these recipes [17], while echinacea is more commonly found in pill and ointment form. When choosing to take a supplement like echinacea, be aware: Supplements aren’t regulated by the FDA, so manufacturers can often get away with making unproven claims [18] about both the contents of the pills and the benefits of those contents.cherries

 

5. Tart Cherries. Turns out tart cherries [19] are good for more than causing a pucker face. Studies have found they can help treat gout [20](a painful form of arthritis that causes swollen, hot, red joints caused by a buildup of uric acid in the blood) ((Cherry consumption and decreased risk of recurrent gout attacks [21]. Zhang, Y., Neogi, T., Chen, C., et al. Boston University, Boston, MA. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 2012 Dec;64(12):4004-11.)) ((Consumption of cherries lowers plasma urate in healthy women [22]. Jacob, RA., Spinozzi, GM., Simon, VA., et al. U.S. Department of Agriculture/ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA. The Journal of Nutrition, 2003 Jun;133(6):1826-9. )). But it’s not just for gout — athletes can benefit, too. In one study, those who drank tart cherry juice [23] for seven days prior to an intense running event showed reduced muscle-pain after the race ((Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial. [24], Kuehl K.S., Perrier E.T., Elliot D.L., Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 2010 May 7;7:17.)) ((Dietary beta-cryptoxanthin and inflammatory polyarthritis: results from a population-based prospective study. [25]Pattison D.J., Symmons D.P., Lunt M., Arthritis Research Campaign Epidemiology Unit, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2005 Aug;82(2):451-5.)). Drink up!

jack

6. Whiskey. No, we do not recommend whiskey for a broken heart or curing any sort of emotional pain. But, it turns out adding a spoonful to warm water [26] may just do the trick to kick that pesky sore throat.

 

 

oranges

7. Oranges. While vitamin C has been linked to helping prevent the onset of colds [27] and respiratory infections, an antioxidant called beta-cryptoxanthin [28], found in oranges and other orange fruits and veggies such as sweet potato and cantaloupe, has been found to help reduce the risk of anti-inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis ((Dietary beta-cryptoxanthin and inflammatory polyarthritis: results from a population-based prospective study. [25]Pattison D.J., Symmons D.P., Lunt M., Arthritis Research Campaign Epidemiology Unit, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2005 Aug;82(2):451-5.)). Another reason to get out that juicer and start making fresh OJ each day. (Or, you know, just eat an orange.)primrose

8. Evening Primrose. Usually found as an oil, this flower’s powers have been linked to treating atopic dermatitis (a chronic itchy skin condition), rheumatoid arthritis, and PMS symptoms ((Evening primrose oil is effective in atopic dermatitis: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. [29] Senapati S., Banerjee S., Gangopadhyay D.N., Department of Dermatology, Calcutta National Medical College, Kolkata, India. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, 2008 Sep-Oct;74(5):447-52.)) ((Herbal therapy for treating rheumatoid arthritis., Cameron M., Gagnier J.J., Chrubasik S [30]., School of Exercise Science, Australian Catholic University, McAuley at Banyo, 1100 Nudgee Road, Banyo, QLD, Australia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2011 Feb 16;(2):CD002948.)). The gamma-inolenic acid in the oil has anti-coagulant effects that may help reduce the effects of cardiovascular illnesses ((Assessment of anticoagulant effect of evening primrose oil. [31], Riaz A., Khan R.A., Ahmed S.P., Department of Pharmacology, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2009 Oct;22(4):355-9.)).

Check out this list for more. http://greatist.com/health/foods-pain-relief

 

That shoulder pain may really be a pain in the neck

There’s a reason why Dr. Jeff Manning of Manning Wellness Clinic is the go-to chiropractic health expert in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. As a knowledgeable professional with more than 15 years of clinical experience, Dr. Manning is known for his ability to talk honestly and openly to his patients; answer questions in a easy-to-understand style; and teach the benefits of chiropractic. Please read below where Dr. Manning talks about that pain in your shoulder that may really be a pain in the neck. 

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SPECIAL FOCUS: BACK AND JOINT HEALTH

By DAPHNE HOWLAND

Special Contributor to the Dallas Morning News

Published: 04 November 2013 04:03 PM

For months, 52-year-old David Moen tried to relieve excruciating pain between his shoulder blades. Hot baths helped, but one day the bath and the heat went on too long, and he suffered heatstroke. That sent him to the doctor.“I suspected I had rotator cuff injuries. It was getting to the point where the pain was debilitating. It was putting me in a foul mood,” says Moen, who lives in Bedford. “I never thought it was a neck injury.”Neither did his doctor — at first. But as Moen’s case shows, the intricate working relationships among the tendons, muscles and nerves of the neck and shoulders mean that a pain in the neck could be a shoulder injury — and vice versa.Moen isn’t sure how he was hurt or even when the pain started exactly. It may have been a motorcycle accident in the mid-1990s, or just his tendency as a former Marine to work hard lifting heavy loads despite pain or strain. About two years ago, the pain started but bothered him only when he did heavy work. As time went on, the pain worsened and took longer and longer to subside.Complicating Moen’s diagnosis were his problems with carpal tunnel syndrome. When he grabbed his motorcycle handlebars, his hands went numb. He’s worked at Bell Helicopter in Hurst for 27 years, sitting at a table that was never meant to be used as a desk.A doctor suspected the carpal tunnel issues could be causing his upper back and shoulder pain, but an MRI revealed a severe neck injury. Surgery to his C5 and C6 neck vertebrae have finally alleviated the pain in his shoulders.“We call the shoulder ‘the great pretender’ because it has a complicated structure of nerves and tendons,” says Dr. Carla L. Young, a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital. “It’s important to tease out the cause because the treatments are different.”

Common complaint

Pain in the neck and shoulder is extremely common because their complex workings are vulnerable to age-related changes, poor posture, lack of exercise and stress.

Degenerative disk disease, an ominous term, happens to everyone starting about age 20. Disks, which cushion the vertebrae, aren’t able to hold as much water, which makes them more delicate, Young says. Meanwhile, tendons in the shoulder’s rotator cuff start changing about age 40.

As those parts lose resilience, stressors like underuse or overuse of muscles and tendons and even emotional stress can cause strain or injury.

DSC_0089Posture is the problem for most people, says Jeffrey Manning, a chiropractor who owns the Manning Wellness Clinic in Dallas. “People look down at their computer, their phones. So the muscles in the front of the neck will start to become shortened and less flexible, and across the shoulder blades they’ll become stretched, but not in a good way. It’s like trees leaning into the wind.”

This begins a cycle that can change joints and bones as they react naturally to the physical demand. “Good stress, like healthy exercise, strengthens bones. But if you stress bones in an imbalanced way, they react in an imbalanced way, and that messes up the mechanical balance of the working joint,” Manning says.

The stress of busy, complicated lives or the emotional toll of bad days or sad life events are often manifested in stiff muscles in the neck and shoulders. Stress hormones worsen the problem, Young says.

“Your muscles get knotted up by very real physical tenseness,” Young says. “But the stress is twofold: Your stress does tend to be carried in the form of shortened muscles in the neck but it also changes the biochemical markers in the body. The same chemicals that are released when you are in stress or in pain are fuel for the pain of muscle tension.”

When to see a doctor

Moen says he wishes he’d gone to a doctor after six months of suffering rather than two years. But Young says to go after more like six weeks.

For one thing, she says, studies show that chronic pain can rewire the brain so that discomfort continues even after the cause is resolved. Plus, many issues can be addressed with conservative measures such as physical therapy, ergonomic changes to the workplace, exercises, modified activity and medication — as long as the problem is accurately diagnosed and caught early.

For stiffness without pain, seeing a doctor may not be necessary. But it’s probably a signal to make changes, these experts say: Be sure you work at a computer with your neck in a neutral position. Exercise regularly; the blood flow helps keep muscles and tendons healthy. Don’t constantly look down at your phone; look up and enjoy the scenery.

“It may start out as a posture issue. Then after six months or a year it becomes a matter of the joints just not working properly anymore,” Manning says. “Your body is such an intricate machine.”

Schedule your FREE phone consultation with Dr. Manning

Schedule your FREE phone consultation with Dr. Manning

The Single Best Thing you can do for your Health

A great video to watch and share. Well worth the time. It’s about 9 minutes total. It’s also a great follow up to my post about the Hotter than Hell ride I did this summer.

 23 1:2 hours video screen shot

  

 

Chiropractic for Cancer Patients

Note from Dr. Manning: I believe strongly that cancer patients benefit from chiropractic care. Chiropractic can help to alleviate pain and discomfort; assist with the absorption of medication; and allow your body to function more efficiently,  therefore strengthening your body’s ability to fight disease.  Chiropractic can not cure cancer, but it can help in a patient’s battle with the effects of this insidious illness. If you or a family member are fighting cancer, please schedule a time to speak to me personally.  http://manningwellness.com/schedule-a-free-consultation/

Cancer Treatment Centers of America Highlighted in ACA News Cover Story

Groundbreaking, Integrated Approach to Treatment Demonstrates Commitment to Patient-centered Care

Arlington, Va.—The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) today announced that Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA)—a pioneer in integrative care, incorporating chiropractic services and other supportive therapies into its advanced, evidenced-based cancer treatments—is the focus of the cover story in the August 2013 issue of ACA News.

At CTCA’s five regional hospitals, chiropractic physicians work on teams alongside surgeons and oncologists to support cancer patients during their treatment. Its patient-centered approach came from a simple question, “If your mother had cancer, how would you want her to be treated?” CTCA’s founder, Richard J. Stephenson, lost his mother to cancer and wished that her treatment had been more focused on providing comprehensive care in addition to the advanced treatment options she needed.

Chiropractic physicians joined CTCA’s staff 10 years ago (due to patient demand), allowing its hospitals to offer truly comprehensive, integrated treatment under one roof. If a patient complains about a headache due to a new chemotherapy drug, his or her treatment team might first suggest the patient try a chiropractic adjustment as opposed to going on yet another medication.

According to Jeffrey Sklar, DC, eastern regional director in the department of chiropractic at CTCA, “We are not treating cancer, we are treating patients with cancer; it is whole-person care. And that is what got me turned on about chiropractic to begin with.”

CTCA’s model has influenced the way oncologists, surgeons and other clinicians around the country think about treating cancer patients. Whole-person cancer treatment combined with a compassionate, nurturing environment—known as the Mother Standard of Care—provides patients with much needed support during treatment.

“I applaud CTCA as an institution for its dedication to treating the whole patient by offering therapy aimed at combating the difficult side-effects of grueling cancer treatments, as well as the cancer itself,” said ACA President Keith Overland, DC. “I am truly inspired by my colleagues at CTCA, who are making a real difference in the quality of life for people undergoing cancer treatment.”

The August 2013 issue of ACA News, featuring more on chiropractic’s role in supporting patients at CTCA, and CTCA’s important support for the chiropractic profession and partnership with ACA, is available on ACA’s website. ACA News is the association’s flagship publication.

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA), celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2013, is the largest professional association in the United States representing doctors of chiropractic. ACA promotes the highest standards of patient care and professional ethics, and supports research that contributes to the health and well-being of millions of chiropractic patients. Visitwww.acatoday.org.  

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Manning Wellness Clinic’s Top 5 Tips for Avoiding Weekend Gardener Syndrome

Spring has sprung! Warmer weather brings visions of homeowners manning the bbq, napping in their hammocks, and enjoying their backyard paradise, the one that has collected piles of leaves, sprouting weeds, dead branches and debris over the winter months. With fervent vigor, the weekend garden warriors head outside and attack their yards. Frequently, injuries result as muscles long-dormant during the winter months experience much more activity in a brief period of time than usual.  Since the height of muscle pain typically sets in about 36 hours after strenuous activity, our office phone starts ringing first thing Monday morning. As we all know, it’s hard to sit immobile at a desk all day when your lower back (or neck, shoulders, knees, etc.) are screaming in pain. Your backyard may look amazing, but your back may pay the price.

Here are the Top 5 Tips for Avoiding Weekend Gardener Syndrome from Dr. Jeff Manning of Manning Wellness Clinic in Dallas: 

1.    Bend your knees: Weeding, one of the most labor-intensive outdoor jobs, is responsible for more low-back injuries than almost any other springtime activity. Repeatedly pulling at stubborn weeds fatigues the lumbar muscles and can strain ligaments and discs. With your back in an already compromised, bent-forward position, and your legs likely straight, one good yank at a tough weed may be enough to bulge a disc or misalign your pelvic bones. A half-kneeling position, or better yet, a narrow blade shovel, is a much safer/easier way to deal with weeds.

2.    Avoid Heavy Lifting: Moving lawn and patio furniture, hauling bags of mulch or seed, planting new shrubs…often requires heavy lifting. Whenever possible, grab an extra set of hands to help with awkward or heavy items. Or pull out the trusty wheelbarrow or hand trolley. If you must lift, don’t forget to bend your knees, and keep the load as close as possible to your core, to take some pressure off of your lower back.

3.   Pace yourself: Your yard does not need to be completed in a day! Breaking up the planting into small increments minimizes your risk of injury and maximizes your chance of a gorgeous garden. Hours of planting increases your risk of strained muscles, ligaments or other tissues. When a muscle becomes fatigued, its ability to stabilize a joint or create enough force to accomplish a routine task diminishes considerably. Raking is a perfect example since it requires you use large, postural muscles in your back. Tip: Take it slow and steady, and make sure to switch sides frequently so that you try to work your body evenly on both sides. Many injuries result from overly tired muscles. Listen to your body; if it’s telling you that it’s getting tired and something is starting to hurt, stop! Your body is communicating that it needs a break and if you don’t listen, it will just yell louder. By changing activities every 30 minutes, repetitive strain risk is decreased.

4.   Don’t trim what you can’t reach: Pruning hedges with heavy sheers is an easy way to acquire rotator cuff tendonitis. It also puts your back at risk for injury. Over extending your arm with a heavy object in your hand is a quick recipe for a tendon injury. When trimming back bushes, keep the sheers close to your body and try to keep your shoulders at or below ninety degrees of elevation. This position protects the delicate rotator cuff from tearing and also protects your back.

5.   Use the right tools for the job: Just like buying the right gear for an exercise program, buying the right tools for yard work can be just as important. Some better rakes and shovels are ergonomically designed so they better fit your body. Make sure your hand fits comfortably on the handle to avoid blisters and wrist strain.  Also look for rakes and shovels which you can comfortably manage rather. Lastly, use the right tool for the job: Don’t try to use a snow shovel to dig a hole for a shrub.

 

 

Tech-Neck: Expert Offers Tips for Reducing and Avoiding Pain and Injury

Dr. Jeff Manning, a leading expert on a new technology-related discomfort called ‘tech-neck’, is featured in an interview on WFAA-TV in Dallas.

Click to watch:  Tech-neck is a growing problem, but Chiropractic can help

Tips from Dr. Jeff Manning, Manning Wellness Clinic; How to Reduce or Prevent Handheld Device Related Pain:

 

  • Limit the amount of time and frequency that you use your device. If you have to use it for an extended period of time, take breaks. Rule of thumb: Take a 5-minute break for every 15 minutes you use your device, and don’t type for more than 3 minutes straight.  Get up and walk around to stretch your muscles. One simple exercise is to tilt your head to one side (ear to shoulder) then to the other side, back to neutral, turn to look all the way to the right, then left.  Back to neutral, then lean head back and back to neutral.  Do all without raising shoulders. Don’t stretch forward…this only accentuates the poor posture your trying to avoid. Do it slowly, without straining. Repeat.

 

  • Be aware of your posture.  Pay attention to how you hold your device. Try to keep your wrists straight and upright. Loosen your grip when possible.  Alternate the fingers you use to type; if you most often use your thumbs, try to switch to your index finger as it allows you to keep the hands more relaxed.

 

  • Use a tablet holder: There are many on the market, but all have the common goal of securing the tablet at a height that is designed to reduce your need to keep your head bent down and forward. Keeping your device at eye-level will help to reduce neck pain and possible damage. It can also prevent what is know as “text-neck” or head-forward posture.
  • Listen to your body: If you are experiencing pain in your neck, back, shoulders, hand…or eye-strain, pay attention. Those aches and pains have a source, and in this case, it may be technology.  Overuse of handheld devices can also exacerbate an existing or old injury so be aware of what you are feeling. Don’t’ fall into the trap of, ‘If I ignore it, maybe it will go away’.
  • Seek help: If you are experiencing discomfort, don’t wait, seek professional help.

 

 

Dr. Jeffrey Manning, DC

Manning Wellness Clinic

2702 McKinney Avenue, suite 202

Dallas, TX 75204

214-720-2225

www.manningwellness.com