Acetaminophen reduces not only pain, but pleasure

A new study says acetaminophen reduces not only pain, but pleasure. This new research definitely gives new reason to pause before causally popping your daily dose of acetaminophen (Tylenol).

(CNN)Feeling so happy you just can’t stand it? You might want to pop some acetaminophen.

A new study has found that acetaminophen, the main ingredient in Tylenol, most forms of Midol and more than 600 other medicines, reduces not only pain but pleasure, as well.

The authors of the study, which was published this week in Psychological Science, say that it was already known that acetaminophen blunted psychological pain. But their new research led them to the conclusion that it also blunted joy — in other words, that it narrowed the range of feelings experienced.

“This means that using Tylenol or similar products might have broader consequences than previously thought,” said Geoffrey Durso, a doctoral student in social psychology at Ohio State University and the lead author of the study. “Rather than just being a pain reliever, acetaminophen can be seen as an all-purpose emotion reliever.”

The researchers tested their thesis by showing 82 college students 40 photographs — some of highly pleasant images, such as children with kittens, and some of highly unpleasant images, such as children who were malnourished.

Half of the participants in the study were given “an acute dose” of acetaminophen — 1,000 milligrams — and the other half were given a placebo with the same appearance. The subjects were then asked to rate the photos according to how unpleasant or pleasant they were.

Those who took the acetaminophen rated all the photos less extremely than those who took the placebo.

“In other words, positive photos were not seen as positively under the influence of acetaminophen and negative photos were not seen as negatively,” the authors reported.

Drug did not alter sense of magnitude in general

The researchers followed up by testing a group of 85 people to see whether this change in judgment applied just to emotions or whether the drug blunted people’s evaluation of magnitude in general.

This group showed the same blunting of emotional reactions. But acetaminophen did not affect how much blue they saw in each photo.

But people who participated in the study did not appear to know they were acting differently, said Baldwin Way, an assistant professor of psychology who was another of the study’s authors.

“Most people probably aren’t aware of how their emotions may be impacted when they take acetaminophen,” Way said.

Each week, about 23% of American adults — or 52 million people — use a medicine containing acetaminophen, according to the nonprofit Consumer Healthcare Products Association.

The authors said it was not known whether other pain relievers, such as ibuprofen and aspirin, have the same effect. But have no fear — they plan to study that question, as well.

 

Dallas Tops List as Worst City for Seasonal Allergy Symptoms

The beautiful weather has arrived, in Dallas anyway! The rest of the country seems conflicted on whether to officially let Spring come to the party. But along with Dallas’ blue skies and gentle breeze comes sneezing, watery eyes, and a nose that looks more like a drippy faucet. It’s all proof that Dallas tops list as worst city for seasonal allergy symptoms.

seasonal allergy symptoms“A direct barometer for allergy season is the tissue box in the reception area. When it’s empty at the end of the day, I know my adult and pediatric patients are suffering with seasonal allergy symptoms, says chiropractor Dr. Jeff Manning of Manning Wellness Clinic in Dallas.

In the most recent Top 10 list compiled by  The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, cities are ranked  based on pollen levels, use of allergy medications and the number of board-certified allergists in the area.

Louisville has moved up the list from No. 5 last year because of higher-than-average pollen counts, high use of allergy medications and too few allergy specialists, according to the foundation.

New York; Columbia, South Carolina; and San Antonio are new to the top 20. Only Los Angeles residents can breathe a sigh of relief; the city fell 39 places from No. 38 last year to No. 77 this year.

Here are the worst cities for spring seasonal allergy symptoms and sufferers in 2014:

1. Louisville, Kentucky

2. Memphis, Tennessee

3. Baton Rouge, Louisiana

4. Oklahoma City

5. Jackson, Mississippi

6. Chattanooga, Tennessee

7. Dallas

8. Richmond, Virginia

9. Birmingham, Alabama

10. McAllen, Texas

“Allergy and asthma patients already have a chronic sensitivity to things like pollen, mold and other airborne allergens, but they can also be more susceptible to rapid changes in temperature and moisture,” Dr. Clifford Bassett, medical director of Allergy and Asthma Care of NY and an ambassador for the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, said in a statement. “A blending of the winter and spring means these patients are at risk of multiple symptoms simultaneously.”

If you think popping a pill is the only way to find relief for seasonal allergy symptoms, you are in for a treat: Chiropractic can help to improve seasonal allergy symptoms and help you to avoid allergy-related illnesses like sinus infections.  In the throes of an allergy attack, antihistamines definitely have their place. But with side effects like sleepiness, dry mouth and an overall clouded feeling, they’re not an ideal match for everyone.

Chiropractic works by helping the body to help itself. By removing interference within the body, nerves can function and perform the way they are meant to. Seasonal allergy symptoms can feel less severe.

For lots of information on chiropractic for allergies and asthma, click on the following link which Manning Wellness posted almost exactly 1 year ago!: http://manningwellness.com/combatting-allergies-and-sinus-issues-with-chiropractic/ 

“As long as Dallas tops list as worst city for allergy sufferers and seasonal allergy symptoms, my door will be open, and my waiting room tissue box full, says Dr. Manning.

Contact us today and find out how and why chiropractic can help you combat seasonal allergy symptoms, allergies, and asthma.

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2702 McKinney Ave, suite 202

Dallas, Texas 75204 214-720-2225

www.manningwellness.com

 

 

For our veterans and families

This week only….
Free Initial Exam for Veterans and/or family members of current or former military. ($52 savings)
Plus, Save 30% on all additional services 
It’s the least we  at Manning Wellness Clinic can do to say thank you…for your service, your bravery, and your commitment to freedom.
We are safer because of you.
or call 214-720-2225
(Note: Valid until Friday, November 15)
veterans day

The Single Best Thing you can do for your Health

A great video to watch and share. Well worth the time. It’s about 9 minutes total. It’s also a great follow up to my post about the Hotter than Hell ride I did this summer.

 23 1:2 hours video screen shot

  

 

Chiropractic for Cancer Patients

Note from Dr. Manning: I believe strongly that cancer patients benefit from chiropractic care. Chiropractic can help to alleviate pain and discomfort; assist with the absorption of medication; and allow your body to function more efficiently,  therefore strengthening your body’s ability to fight disease.  Chiropractic can not cure cancer, but it can help in a patient’s battle with the effects of this insidious illness. If you or a family member are fighting cancer, please schedule a time to speak to me personally.  http://manningwellness.com/schedule-a-free-consultation/

Cancer Treatment Centers of America Highlighted in ACA News Cover Story

Groundbreaking, Integrated Approach to Treatment Demonstrates Commitment to Patient-centered Care

Arlington, Va.—The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) today announced that Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA)—a pioneer in integrative care, incorporating chiropractic services and other supportive therapies into its advanced, evidenced-based cancer treatments—is the focus of the cover story in the August 2013 issue of ACA News.

At CTCA’s five regional hospitals, chiropractic physicians work on teams alongside surgeons and oncologists to support cancer patients during their treatment. Its patient-centered approach came from a simple question, “If your mother had cancer, how would you want her to be treated?” CTCA’s founder, Richard J. Stephenson, lost his mother to cancer and wished that her treatment had been more focused on providing comprehensive care in addition to the advanced treatment options she needed.

Chiropractic physicians joined CTCA’s staff 10 years ago (due to patient demand), allowing its hospitals to offer truly comprehensive, integrated treatment under one roof. If a patient complains about a headache due to a new chemotherapy drug, his or her treatment team might first suggest the patient try a chiropractic adjustment as opposed to going on yet another medication.

According to Jeffrey Sklar, DC, eastern regional director in the department of chiropractic at CTCA, “We are not treating cancer, we are treating patients with cancer; it is whole-person care. And that is what got me turned on about chiropractic to begin with.”

CTCA’s model has influenced the way oncologists, surgeons and other clinicians around the country think about treating cancer patients. Whole-person cancer treatment combined with a compassionate, nurturing environment—known as the Mother Standard of Care—provides patients with much needed support during treatment.

“I applaud CTCA as an institution for its dedication to treating the whole patient by offering therapy aimed at combating the difficult side-effects of grueling cancer treatments, as well as the cancer itself,” said ACA President Keith Overland, DC. “I am truly inspired by my colleagues at CTCA, who are making a real difference in the quality of life for people undergoing cancer treatment.”

The August 2013 issue of ACA News, featuring more on chiropractic’s role in supporting patients at CTCA, and CTCA’s important support for the chiropractic profession and partnership with ACA, is available on ACA’s website. ACA News is the association’s flagship publication.

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA), celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2013, is the largest professional association in the United States representing doctors of chiropractic. ACA promotes the highest standards of patient care and professional ethics, and supports research that contributes to the health and well-being of millions of chiropractic patients. Visitwww.acatoday.org.  

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Children’s Headaches: Vision may Not be to Blame

When a child suffers recurrent headaches, a parent’s first reaction is usually to assume that bad vision is to blame. Current research now says otherwise. At Manning Wellness Clinic, Dr. Manning has treated many pediatric patients who present with headache symptoms. With proper Chiropractic care, we are almost always successful in offering the children a drug-free, gentle treatment to relieve their headaches. Headaches will often times interfere with a child’s ability to pay attention in school. Getting treatment sooner rather than later is key.

CNN: If your child gets recurring headaches and you think they might need glasses, you may be mistaken – a new study says children’s headaches are rarely triggered by vision problems.

The study, presented Monday at the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s annual meeting, was conducted by researchers at the ophthalmology clinic of Albany Medical Center in New York. They evaluated medical records of nearly 160 children under the age of 18 who were being seen at the clinic for frequent headaches.

Researchers compared the exams of children with headaches to their earlier vision exams and other medical records. In 75% of the children, the vision test results were the same. No significant link was found between the headaches and a need for glasses – even if the headaches happened when the child is doing a visual task like homework.

“We hope our study will help reassure parents that in most cases their children’s headaches are not related to vision or eye problems, and that most headaches will clear up in time,” said Dr. Zachary Roth, who led the research team. “The information should also be useful to family doctors and pediatricians in caring for children and parents who have this common health concern.”

Researchers found in most cases, the children’s headaches resolved over a period of time regardless of whether the child got a new prescription for glasses or not. And those who did get new glasses were no more likely to have their headaches get better.

It’s highly unusual to find something wrong with the eyes when a child complains of headaches, says Dr. Daniel Neely, a professor of ophthalmology at Indiana University who specializes in pediatrics and the chairman of theAmerican Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus’ vision screening committee.

“The study is consistent with everyone’s clinical practice around the country. If the child has headaches the first stop should be their primary care doctor, and they will assess whether or not a comprehensive eye exam would be indicated.”

According to Neely, vision screenings – whether someone just measures the vision with an eye chart or with a vision screening device (camera-type devices called photo screeners) – should be part of a pediatric well-child visit .

“Some of them are very good about doing it and some of them are not very good about doing it, but the recommendation is that it should be done every year or two,” he says. ” … What we don’t recommend is that everyone get a comprehensive eye doctor eye exam unless they fail a screening or unless there is something in their family history that puts them at increased risk.”

Neely says if vision screening is not being offered as part of the well-child visits, ask for it – sooner rather than later.

“The reason that there’s a time factor on these screenings is because of a condition called amblyopia,” he says. “Young children less than age 7 are neurologically immature and if you have something significant affecting their vision, their brain will actually stop using the eye or both eyes and that becomes permanent loss of vision if not detected and treated. So the younger you identify them, the more easily you can treat them.”

Amblyopia, or lazy eye, is very common in children and is responsible for more vision loss than all the other causes combined, according to AAPOS. It happens when the eye sends blurry images to the brain, confusing it and causing the brain to learn to ignore images from the weak eye.

And Neely says as children get older they are less likely to respond to corrective treatment. “So if you detect something at age 10 that was serious, it would be too late. And that, again, is why we want the pediatrician doing this, because by the time the kid gets to school that window of opportunity is closing. So a vision screening by the school nurse in first grade might be too late.”

Most pediatricians will do some variation of the screening at every visit, Neely says, but AAPOS recommends children have a documented vision measurement by age 5.