Top 10 Foods you Should Buy Organic

Consumer Reports recently published a report detailing the top foods you should always try to buy organic. Since organic foods can typically cost close to 50% more, we decided we’d list the Top 10 Foods you Should Buy Organic.

Here you go…..short and simple.

For fruits, there are five: peaches, tangerines, nectarines, strawberries, and cranberries. And for vegetables: green beans, bell and hot peppers, sweet potatoes, and carrots.

According to Consumer Reports, “The good news is we did find some fruits and vegetables where conventional versions were about as safe as the organic versions when it comes to pesticide residues.”

These include broccoli grown in the U.S. and Mexico; U.S. cherries; grapes from the U.S., Chile, Mexico, and Peru; and lettuce from the U.S. and Mexico.

 

 

8 Foods that Fight Pain

Before reaching for a bottle of painkillers, try adding some of these 8 Foods that Fight Pain to your diet.

Other than just great taste, there are foods that have the ability to fight pain and reduce inflammation. Dallas chiropractor, Dr. Jeff Manning, says that adding these foods to your diet, especially combined with chiropractic care, can help your body to heal more quickly. “Foods can greatly affect inflammation in the body; some artificial sweeteners can add to or increase inflammation, while other foods like ginger can do the exact opposite,” says chiropractor Jeff Manning of Manning Wellness Clinic in Dallas.

The following is a great list of 8 Foods that Fight Pain. You don’t need to, nor should you, try to add all at once, but trying one at a time will help you determine which work best for you.

And, according to Greatist.com, the winners are….

8 Natural Foods to Eat for Pain Relief

Whether it’s residual aches from an exceptionally tough workout, the beginnings of a pesky cold, or waking up on the wrong side of the bed, some research suggests supplementing those pain pills with certain foods could be just as helpful.

Believe it or not, those healthy fruits, veggies, and whole grains we try to pack in our diets may do more than just feed our bodies well — many of them are considered to have anti-inflammatory properties. Sometimes inflammation is a good thing, we’ll give you that — it protects our body when we’ve been injured — but it can also be painful. (Think asthma and arthritis, inflamed sore throats, and cuts or scrapes.) While some have linked [1] certain foods (including chocolate, eggs, wheat, meat, and corn) to causing inflammation, there’s also evidence that a few select delectables could help prevent it, too ((Dietary strategies for improving post-prandial glucose, lipids, inflammation, and cardiovascular health [2]. O’Keefe, J.H., Gheewala, N.M., O’Keefe, J.O. Mid America Heart Institute and University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2008 Jan 22;51(3):249-55. )). Here are eight foods that research suggests may actually help reduce pain.

ginger

1. Ginger. Ginger [3] is basically a wonder root. It combats nausea and motion sickness, and fights off pain with itsanti-inflammatory [4] properties ((Ginger — an herbal medicinal product with broad anti-inflammatory actions [5]. Grzanna R., Lindmark L., Frondoza C.G., RMG Biosciences, Inc. Journal of Medicinal Food, 2005 Summer;8(2):125-32.)). Some especially great news for the ladies: One study showed that ginger (specifically in the form of a 250g or 500g capsule of powdered ginger) was as effective as ibuprofen in relieving menstrual pain ((Comparison of effects of ginger, mefenamic acid, and ibuprofen on pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea. [6] Ozgoli G., Goli M., Moattar F., Nursing and Midwifery School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2009 Feb;15(2):129-32.))! Plus, ginger can be ingested a variety of ways, from supplements, to tea and cookies [7], to stir fry [8].

 salmon

 

2. Salmon. Not only is salmon tasty and a healthy protein, but it’s full of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to reduce arthritic pain (especially in the neck and back) ((Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) as an anti-inflammatory: an alternative to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for discogenic pain. [9], Maroon J.C., Bost J.W., Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Surgical Neurololgy, 2006 Apr;65(4):326-31.)). In one study, the relief experienced from consuming omega-3s in the form of a fish oil supplement was comparable to the relief experienced from taking ibuprofen. Chow down on some of those omega-3s with this baked salmon with avocado yogurt sauce [10] tonight.

 coffee

 

3. Coffee. Just one more excuse to grab that second cup of Joe! Research suggests caffeine can reduce pain in those suffering from exercise-induced muscular injury and pain ((Caffeine attenuates delayed-onset muscle pain and force loss following eccentric exercise. [11] Maridakis V., O’Connor P.J., Dudley G.A., et. al. Department of Kinesiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-6554, USA. Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society, 2007 Mar;8(3):237-43.)). Not only that, when taken with a standard dose of pain reliever (ibuprofen, for example), one study found that a 100mg to 130mg caffeine supplement — equal to about the amount of caffeine in one cup of coffee —  increased pain relief ((Caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant for acute pain in adults. [12], Derry C.J., Derry S., Moore R.A., Pain Research and Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Nuffield Division of Anaesthetics), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Cochrane Database Systematic Review, 2012 Mar 14;3:CD009281.)).

echinacea

4. Echinacea and Sage. Got an aching throat? Some research shows that throat sprays containing sage or echinacea can help provide relief from that nasty sore throat ((Echinacea/sage or chlorhexidine/lidocaine for treating acute sore throats: a randomized double-blind trial., [13] Schapowal A., Berger D., Klein P., Suter A., Allergy Clinic, CH-7302 Landquart, Switzerland. European Journal of Medical Research, 2009 Sep 1;14(9):406-12.)), though there have been few other studies on this benefit, so the evidence isn’t hulk strong [14]. Another survey looking at 14 different studies found that echinacea [15] can decrease the number of cold infections caught, and reduce their durations ((Evaluation of echinacea for the prevention and treatment of the common cold: a meta-analysis. [16] Shah S.A., Sander S., White C.M., University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Storrs, CT. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2007 Jul;7(7):473-80.)). Sage is easy to find at most grocery stores and is also especially tasty in any of these recipes [17], while echinacea is more commonly found in pill and ointment form. When choosing to take a supplement like echinacea, be aware: Supplements aren’t regulated by the FDA, so manufacturers can often get away with making unproven claims [18] about both the contents of the pills and the benefits of those contents.cherries

 

5. Tart Cherries. Turns out tart cherries [19] are good for more than causing a pucker face. Studies have found they can help treat gout [20](a painful form of arthritis that causes swollen, hot, red joints caused by a buildup of uric acid in the blood) ((Cherry consumption and decreased risk of recurrent gout attacks [21]. Zhang, Y., Neogi, T., Chen, C., et al. Boston University, Boston, MA. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 2012 Dec;64(12):4004-11.)) ((Consumption of cherries lowers plasma urate in healthy women [22]. Jacob, RA., Spinozzi, GM., Simon, VA., et al. U.S. Department of Agriculture/ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA. The Journal of Nutrition, 2003 Jun;133(6):1826-9. )). But it’s not just for gout — athletes can benefit, too. In one study, those who drank tart cherry juice [23] for seven days prior to an intense running event showed reduced muscle-pain after the race ((Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial. [24], Kuehl K.S., Perrier E.T., Elliot D.L., Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 2010 May 7;7:17.)) ((Dietary beta-cryptoxanthin and inflammatory polyarthritis: results from a population-based prospective study. [25]Pattison D.J., Symmons D.P., Lunt M., Arthritis Research Campaign Epidemiology Unit, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2005 Aug;82(2):451-5.)). Drink up!

jack

6. Whiskey. No, we do not recommend whiskey for a broken heart or curing any sort of emotional pain. But, it turns out adding a spoonful to warm water [26] may just do the trick to kick that pesky sore throat.

 

 

oranges

7. Oranges. While vitamin C has been linked to helping prevent the onset of colds [27] and respiratory infections, an antioxidant called beta-cryptoxanthin [28], found in oranges and other orange fruits and veggies such as sweet potato and cantaloupe, has been found to help reduce the risk of anti-inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis ((Dietary beta-cryptoxanthin and inflammatory polyarthritis: results from a population-based prospective study. [25]Pattison D.J., Symmons D.P., Lunt M., Arthritis Research Campaign Epidemiology Unit, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2005 Aug;82(2):451-5.)). Another reason to get out that juicer and start making fresh OJ each day. (Or, you know, just eat an orange.)primrose

8. Evening Primrose. Usually found as an oil, this flower’s powers have been linked to treating atopic dermatitis (a chronic itchy skin condition), rheumatoid arthritis, and PMS symptoms ((Evening primrose oil is effective in atopic dermatitis: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. [29] Senapati S., Banerjee S., Gangopadhyay D.N., Department of Dermatology, Calcutta National Medical College, Kolkata, India. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, 2008 Sep-Oct;74(5):447-52.)) ((Herbal therapy for treating rheumatoid arthritis., Cameron M., Gagnier J.J., Chrubasik S [30]., School of Exercise Science, Australian Catholic University, McAuley at Banyo, 1100 Nudgee Road, Banyo, QLD, Australia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2011 Feb 16;(2):CD002948.)). The gamma-inolenic acid in the oil has anti-coagulant effects that may help reduce the effects of cardiovascular illnesses ((Assessment of anticoagulant effect of evening primrose oil. [31], Riaz A., Khan R.A., Ahmed S.P., Department of Pharmacology, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2009 Oct;22(4):355-9.)).

Check out this list for more. http://greatist.com/health/foods-pain-relief

 

14 Foods you Should Never Eat

It seems every time you try to make a healthy food choice, some new research tells you, “NO, DON’T EAT THAT!!” At the end of the day, it’s not only frustrating, but incredibly confusing, too. The link below, 14 Foods you Should Never Eat  is a somewhat new list, with some obvious choices (artificial food coloring), but also some new ones like sprouts. See, that’s where it gets confusing since sprouted everything seems to be all the rage! Take a peek….maybe make a few adjustments to your diet. We’re veering into a new year, so the timing is perfect! If you have any questions and/or other suggestions for the list, please post and share.

 

http://www.rodalenews.com/food-ingredients-avoid

One of the 14 foods you should never eat

 

Splenda downgraded from “safe” to “caution”

Note from Dr. Manning: Our new patient history paperwork specifically asks about artificial sweetener consumption because I oftentimes find a link between consumption and inflammation. I do not personably consume artificial sweeteners of any kind and suggest the same to my patients.

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Group Cites Need to Evaluate Forthcoming Italian Study Linking Artificial Sweetener to Leukemia in Mice

June 12, 2013

splendaThe Center for Science in the Public Interest is downgrading sucralose, the artificial sweetener better known by the brand name Splenda, in its Chemical Cuisine guide to food additives. The nonprofit food safety watchdog group had long rated sucralose as “safe,” but is now placing it in the “caution” category pending a review of an unpublished study by an independent Italian laboratory that found that the sweetener caused leukemia in mice. The only previous long-term feeding studies in animals were conducted by the compound’s manufacturers.

CSPI’s Chemical Cuisine gives the artificial sweeteners saccharinaspartame, and acesulfame potassium “avoid” ratings, the group’s lowest. CSPI considers rebiana, a natural high-potency sweetener obtained from stevia, to be “safe,” though deserving of better testing.

“Sucralose may prove to be safer than saccharin, aspartame, and acesulfame potassium, but the forthcoming Italian study warrants careful scrutiny before we can be confident that the sweetener is safe for use in food,” said CSPI executive director Michael F. Jacobson.

Despite its concerns about the risk posed by artificial sweeteners, CSPI says consumers who drink soda are still probably better off drinking diet soda than sugar-sweetened soda, which poses the greater and demonstrable risks of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, gout, tooth decay, and other health problems. Soft drinks—diet or regular—often contain questionable food dyes and so-called caramel coloring that is contaminated with cancer-causing 4-methylimidazole. To avoid the risks of both sugars and non-caloric sweeteners, CSPI urges people to switch to water, seltzer water, flavored unsweetened waters, seltzer mixed with some fruit juice, or unsweetened iced tea.

CSPI has also made new entries in Chemical Cuisine for some other natural, high-potency sweeteners that aren’t widely used yet but are on the horizon. Monkfruit extract, used in some foods, contain substances called mogrosides that are about 200 times sweeter than sugar, but with an aftertaste described as licorice-like. Monkfruit, also known as Luo Han Guo and Lo Han Kuo, has been used as food in China for several hundred years. Monatin is a plant-based sweeter derived from the root of a shrub found in South Africa that is supposedly some 3,000 times sweeter than sugar. Those two sweeteners might also prove to be safe, but CSPI gives them a “caution” rating on the basis of inadequate testing.

Chemical Cuisine includes much more than sweeteners. While most of the additives will be disclosed on ingredients lists, some will not. Transglutaminase is a naturally occurring enzyme that’s presumably safe on its own. Known informally as “meat glue,” the enzyme lets chefs or manufacturers fuse together inexpensive cuts of beef into the distinctive shape of more expensive filet mignon. Besides cheating consumers, that practice can result in a less-safe steak since bacteria ordinarily confined to the surface of the steak are driven into the interior.

Castoreum is a rarely used additive that CSPI, as well as the Food and Drug Administration, assume to be safe. Any food manufacturer that actually uses it will likely list it among “natural flavorings” on ingredient lists and not disclose where castoreum actually comes from: the anal castor sacs of beavers.

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Manning Wellness Clinic  2702 McKinney Ave, s. 202   Dallas, TX 75204

214-720-2225  www.manningwellness.com

Manning Wellness Clinic is a top-rated comprehensive chiropractic clinic servicing

Uptown, downtown, Park Cities and the Oak Lawn areas of Dallas.

 

Are Apples Bad for your Health?

Apples Top EWG’s Dirty Dozen

images-1Washington, D.C. – Apples top the Environmental Working Group’s annual Dirty Dozen™ list of most pesticide-contaminated produce, followed by strawberries, grapes and celery. Other fresh fruits and vegetables on the new Dirty Dozen list, a part of EWG’s 2013 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ are peaches, spinach, sweet bell peppers, imported nectarines, cucumbers, potatoes, cherry tomatoes and hot peppers.

EWG’s Clean Fifteen™ list, those fruits and vegetables with the least pesticide load, consists of corn, onions, pineapples, avocados, cabbage, frozen sweet peas, papayas, mangoes, asparagus, eggplant, kiwi, grapefruit, cantaloupe, sweet potatoes and mushrooms.

“When given a choice, more consumers are choosing organic fruits and vegetables or using EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to find an easy affordable way to avoid toxic chemicals,” said Sonya Lunder, an EWG senior analyst. “They want to eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables without eating too many pesticides. And they want to support local farms and agriculture that is better for the environment.”

EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce, now in its 9th year, ranks pesticide contamination on 48 popular fruits and vegetables, based on an analysis of more than 28,000 samples tested by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and federal Food and Drug Administration.

 

Dr. Jeffrey Manning, DC

Manning Wellness Clinic

2702 McKinney Avenue, suite 202

Dallas, TX 75204

214-720-2225

www.manningwellness.com

Request an Appointment

TOP 10 USES FOR VINEGAR

TOP 10 USES FOR VINEGAR

TS-87589654_Bottle-of-white-vinegar_s3x4_al

Vinegar is an inexpensive, healthy way to clean and disinfect your home.

Cleaning drains: Pour 1/2 cup baking soda in the drain, followed by 1/2 cup vinegar; the mixture will foam as it cleans and deodorizes. Use every few weeks to keep drains clean.

Mildew on plastic shower curtains: Put the shower curtain in the washing machine with light-colored towels; add 1 cup white vinegar to the detergent and wash.

Soap scum on shower: Spray on vinegar, scrub and rinse.

Toilet hard-water rings: Shut off water at the tank and flush to remove as much water as possible. Spray vinegar on the ring, sprinkle in borax and scrub with drywall sandpaper.

Shower head deposits: Pour white vinegar into a plastic bag, tape to the shower head and leave overnight. Brush the shower head to remove remaining deposits.

Softening laundry: Fill dispenser with 1/4 cup white vinegar to soften laundry without leaving odors.

Cleaning vinyl floors: Add 1/4 cup vinegar to 1 gallon hot water for spotless floors.

Cleaning windows: Mix 50 percent white vinegar with 50 percent water in a spray bottle. Spray glass surfaces and wipe dry.

Neutralize pet odors: Mix 1 part white vinegar to 3 parts water. Pour on stained areas and blot; never rub to remove stains and odors.

Greasy dishes: Mix 2 tablespoons white vinegar to liquid dish soap to boost its cleaning power.

If you have any other ways you use vinegar, please let us know in the comments section! The more the better!

 

Dr. Jeffrey Manning, DC

Manning Wellness Clinic

2702 McKinney Avenue, suite 202

Dallas, TX 75204

214-720-2225

www.manningwellness.com

Request an Appointment