For our veterans and families

This week only….
Free Initial Exam for Veterans and/or family members of current or former military. ($52 savings)
Plus, Save 30% on all additional services 
It’s the least we  at Manning Wellness Clinic can do to say thank you…for your service, your bravery, and your commitment to freedom.
We are safer because of you.
or call 214-720-2225
(Note: Valid until Friday, November 15)
veterans day

That shoulder pain may really be a pain in the neck

There’s a reason why Dr. Jeff Manning of Manning Wellness Clinic is the go-to chiropractic health expert in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. As a knowledgeable professional with more than 15 years of clinical experience, Dr. Manning is known for his ability to talk honestly and openly to his patients; answer questions in a easy-to-understand style; and teach the benefits of chiropractic. Please read below where Dr. Manning talks about that pain in your shoulder that may really be a pain in the neck. 

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SPECIAL FOCUS: BACK AND JOINT HEALTH

By DAPHNE HOWLAND

Special Contributor to the Dallas Morning News

Published: 04 November 2013 04:03 PM

For months, 52-year-old David Moen tried to relieve excruciating pain between his shoulder blades. Hot baths helped, but one day the bath and the heat went on too long, and he suffered heatstroke. That sent him to the doctor.“I suspected I had rotator cuff injuries. It was getting to the point where the pain was debilitating. It was putting me in a foul mood,” says Moen, who lives in Bedford. “I never thought it was a neck injury.”Neither did his doctor — at first. But as Moen’s case shows, the intricate working relationships among the tendons, muscles and nerves of the neck and shoulders mean that a pain in the neck could be a shoulder injury — and vice versa.Moen isn’t sure how he was hurt or even when the pain started exactly. It may have been a motorcycle accident in the mid-1990s, or just his tendency as a former Marine to work hard lifting heavy loads despite pain or strain. About two years ago, the pain started but bothered him only when he did heavy work. As time went on, the pain worsened and took longer and longer to subside.Complicating Moen’s diagnosis were his problems with carpal tunnel syndrome. When he grabbed his motorcycle handlebars, his hands went numb. He’s worked at Bell Helicopter in Hurst for 27 years, sitting at a table that was never meant to be used as a desk.A doctor suspected the carpal tunnel issues could be causing his upper back and shoulder pain, but an MRI revealed a severe neck injury. Surgery to his C5 and C6 neck vertebrae have finally alleviated the pain in his shoulders.“We call the shoulder ‘the great pretender’ because it has a complicated structure of nerves and tendons,” says Dr. Carla L. Young, a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital. “It’s important to tease out the cause because the treatments are different.”

Common complaint

Pain in the neck and shoulder is extremely common because their complex workings are vulnerable to age-related changes, poor posture, lack of exercise and stress.

Degenerative disk disease, an ominous term, happens to everyone starting about age 20. Disks, which cushion the vertebrae, aren’t able to hold as much water, which makes them more delicate, Young says. Meanwhile, tendons in the shoulder’s rotator cuff start changing about age 40.

As those parts lose resilience, stressors like underuse or overuse of muscles and tendons and even emotional stress can cause strain or injury.

DSC_0089Posture is the problem for most people, says Jeffrey Manning, a chiropractor who owns the Manning Wellness Clinic in Dallas. “People look down at their computer, their phones. So the muscles in the front of the neck will start to become shortened and less flexible, and across the shoulder blades they’ll become stretched, but not in a good way. It’s like trees leaning into the wind.”

This begins a cycle that can change joints and bones as they react naturally to the physical demand. “Good stress, like healthy exercise, strengthens bones. But if you stress bones in an imbalanced way, they react in an imbalanced way, and that messes up the mechanical balance of the working joint,” Manning says.

The stress of busy, complicated lives or the emotional toll of bad days or sad life events are often manifested in stiff muscles in the neck and shoulders. Stress hormones worsen the problem, Young says.

“Your muscles get knotted up by very real physical tenseness,” Young says. “But the stress is twofold: Your stress does tend to be carried in the form of shortened muscles in the neck but it also changes the biochemical markers in the body. The same chemicals that are released when you are in stress or in pain are fuel for the pain of muscle tension.”

When to see a doctor

Moen says he wishes he’d gone to a doctor after six months of suffering rather than two years. But Young says to go after more like six weeks.

For one thing, she says, studies show that chronic pain can rewire the brain so that discomfort continues even after the cause is resolved. Plus, many issues can be addressed with conservative measures such as physical therapy, ergonomic changes to the workplace, exercises, modified activity and medication — as long as the problem is accurately diagnosed and caught early.

For stiffness without pain, seeing a doctor may not be necessary. But it’s probably a signal to make changes, these experts say: Be sure you work at a computer with your neck in a neutral position. Exercise regularly; the blood flow helps keep muscles and tendons healthy. Don’t constantly look down at your phone; look up and enjoy the scenery.

“It may start out as a posture issue. Then after six months or a year it becomes a matter of the joints just not working properly anymore,” Manning says. “Your body is such an intricate machine.”

Schedule your FREE phone consultation with Dr. Manning

Schedule your FREE phone consultation with Dr. Manning

Top 10 Best Foods For Brain Health

Hate to state the obvious, but what you eat plays a pivotal role in how you feel. There are best foods for brain health. It’s the reason chiropractor Dr. Jeff Manning of Manning Wellness Clinic in Dallas routinely asks patients about their diet. The more in tune you are with how you feel, the more likely you are to make positive changes to your diet. “Think about the times of the day you feel the sluggishness,” says Dr. Manning, “and think about what you ate a few hours before. Was is a burger? Salad? Overly sweet smoothie? Chances are those foods are directly impacting your energy levels.” Dr. Manning suggests keeping a food diary for a few days to better track how you feel. “Say you eat lunch at noon, take note around 3pm and jot down how you are feeling. Look back over your diary and see what foods gave you the biggest boost, especially to your brain.”

The following is a list of the Top 10 Best Foods for Brain Health. These foods are proven to enhance your brain health as well as ensure your brain is functioning properly on a daily basis. So sit back, enjoy, and put those chips away – they won’t help make your brain any better or bigger, but they will increase other parts of your body.

10. Oysters for Brain Health

Oysters are a Best Food for Brain Health

If you’re a seafood kind of person, then today just may be your lucky day. Oysters are a best food for brain health. Experiments have shown that oysters are great for your brain, no matter your age. Because they are rich in zinc as well as iron, eating this under-the-sea-delight will help to keep your mind sharp and increase your ability to recall information easily. Zinc and iron have been linked to the brain’s ability to stay focused and remember information. A lack of zinc and iron can result in memory lapses, poor concentration, and of course other ailments throughout the body.

9. Whole Grains for Your Brains

Whole grains are a Best Food for Brain HealthIf you’ve ever tried to lose weight, you know just how healthy whole grains are for your body; however, they are also a best food for brain health.  Whole wheat, bran, and wheat germ have high contents of folate, as do brown rice, oatmeal, whole-grain breads, barley, and others. All of these foods work to increase blood flow to the brain which means a higher quality and quantity of brain function. Also, these whole grain foods contain a lot of vitamin B6, which is full of thiamine. Thiamine is great for anyone trying to improve their memory. Scientific research has shown that memory loss dramatically increases by the time you reach your late 60’s or early 70’s; so whole grains are especially good for you as you get older.

8. Tea

Forget your coffee in the morning (or as your afternoon pick-me-up)- try a cup of tea! The liquid version of a best food for brain health. Freshly brewed green or black tea is extremely beneficial to your brain because it is full of catechins. Have you ever had a day where you just feel drained, tired, and “too lazy” to think? It may be because you are lacking catechins in your brain. Catechins are great for keeping your mind sharp, fresh, and functioning properly. Not only do they keep your brain working right, they also allow it to relax and help to fight against mental fatigue. While green tea is much more potent than black tea, both are extremely good for you. Tea is definitely a great thing to drink early in the morning to ensure you’re starting your brain off right.

7. Eggs Help Keep Your Memory from Cracking

Eggs are a Best Food for Brain Health

 When we get older, our brains begin to shrink due to something called brain atrophy. While some of us might want other parts of our body to shrink, I’m pretty sure no one wants a shrinking brain. However, we can fight against this natural process by eating eggs. This is because eggs are full of vitamin B12 as well as lecithin. Vitamin B12 helps to fight against brain shrinkage, which is often seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Eggs, though very unhealthy if you eat too many of them, are full of essential fatty acids. The yolk, though very high in cholesterol, is also high in choline, which is a very important building block of brain cells. Choline can help improve your memory. While eating too many eggs can be bad for your health, eating 1-2 egg products a day can be great  brain food.

6. Curry to Spice Up Your Brain Health

 curry is a Best Food for Brain Health

This spicy food is a great way to spice up your brain and keep it fresh. A main ingredient in curry powder, curcumin is full of antioxidants that help fight against brain aging and maintain cognitive function as you get older. These antioxidants also fight against free radical damage that can occur within the brain as well as the body.  Free radicals can cause inflammation and other ailments within the body. Not only is curry good for your brain, it also can fight against diabetes and heart disease. Too hot for you to handle? You don’t have to have curry for lunch and dinner each day; the smallest amount of curry once a month can be a highly beneficial best food for brain health.

5. Berries, Berry Good Food for Your Brain

berries are a Best Food for Brain Health

If you’re not a vegetable person, you can rely on fruit, especially berries, to improve your brain health. For example, blueberries are well known for their role in improving motor skills as well as your overall learning capacity. They are often called the best berry for your brain, and today you may notice the plethora of products using blueberries. Most berries, including blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, and others, are full of antioxidants that are great for boosting the brain. You can help reverse the effects of aging on the brain by eating these berries once a day. Berries are sometimes referred to as “super-fruits” because most of them contain fisetin and flavenoid, which are great for improving your memory and allowing you to easily recall past events. A delicious and helpful food for the brain.

4. Nuts and Seeds

nuts-and-seeds are a Best Food for Brain Health

 

Looking for a best food for brain health that’s a snack food? Then look no further than nuts and seeds… The good thing about this is that all types of nuts are included. This means peanuts, hazelnuts, cashews, almonds, walnuts, pecans, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, and any other type of nut or seed you can think of, are good for your brain. Nuts and seeds are full of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, as well as folate, vitamin E, and vitamin B6. All of these nutrients allow you to think more clearly. They also help you think more positively, because Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids work as natural antidepressants. Some seeds and nuts are also full of thiamine and magnesium, which are great for memory, cognitive function, and brain nourishment.

3. Leafy Green Vegetables

Leafy greens are a Best Food for Brain Health

 

Leafy green vegetables such as cabbage, kale, spinach, and others, while not very well-liked by children, are excellent for the brain of children and adults alike. These vegetables help greatly when it comes time to remember old information and process it like you just learned it yesterday. This is because these foods are often full of vitamin B6, B12, and folate, which are great compounds needed within the brain to break down homocystein levels, which can lead to forgetfulness and even Alzheimer’s disease. These vegetables are often very high in iron content. If there is not enough iron in-take, cognitive activity slows down greatly. So when mom always urged you to eat your spinach, now you know why:  Greens are a best food for brain health! A Manning Wellness favorite is Kale Chips.

2. Fish

fish is a Best Food for Brain Health

Eating fish overall is greatly beneficial to your health, especially that of your brain. Fish is full of Omega-3, which is a fatty acid known to be highly beneficial to the body in various aspects. Eating one serving of fish a week can highly decrease one’s chances of getting Alzheimer’s disease. These fatty acids help with brain function because they coat the neurons that at times have a fatty acid layer that becomes stiff due to a high content cholesterol and saturated fat in the body. Omega-3s will coat the neurons with good fat, allowing them to move easily throughout the brain. Omega-3s also provides more oxygen to the brain, as well as allows one to retain new information while still remembering old information. The best fish to eat for brain health are salmon, tuna, and herring.

1. Chocolate

chocolate is a Best Food for Brain Health

 While eating hundreds of Hershey bars may make you sick, and drinking a lot of hot cocoa in a day just may do the same, the main ingredient in these oh-so-delicious foods, cocoa, is said to be very nutritious for the brain. Scientists have proven that the antioxidant content found in just two or three tablespoons of cocoa powder is much stronger than those antioxidants found in other foods, such as green tea or red wine. The main antioxidant found in cocoa, known as flavonols, is said to help increase blood flow to the brain. While normal milk chocolate lacks flavonols, you will find plenty of it in dark chocolate. And isn’t it great news to know that chocolate is good for your brain.

 

Manning Wellness Clinic

2702 McKinney Avenue, suite 202

Dallas, TX 75204

214-720-2225

www.manningwellness.com

Dr. Manning was voted Best Chiropractor in Dallas

(reprinted from Toptenz lists)

 

The Single Best Thing you can do for your Health

A great video to watch and share. Well worth the time. It’s about 9 minutes total. It’s also a great follow up to my post about the Hotter than Hell ride I did this summer.

 23 1:2 hours video screen shot

  

 

Splenda downgraded from “safe” to “caution”

Note from Dr. Manning: Our new patient history paperwork specifically asks about artificial sweetener consumption because I oftentimes find a link between consumption and inflammation. I do not personably consume artificial sweeteners of any kind and suggest the same to my patients.

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Group Cites Need to Evaluate Forthcoming Italian Study Linking Artificial Sweetener to Leukemia in Mice

June 12, 2013

splendaThe Center for Science in the Public Interest is downgrading sucralose, the artificial sweetener better known by the brand name Splenda, in its Chemical Cuisine guide to food additives. The nonprofit food safety watchdog group had long rated sucralose as “safe,” but is now placing it in the “caution” category pending a review of an unpublished study by an independent Italian laboratory that found that the sweetener caused leukemia in mice. The only previous long-term feeding studies in animals were conducted by the compound’s manufacturers.

CSPI’s Chemical Cuisine gives the artificial sweeteners saccharinaspartame, and acesulfame potassium “avoid” ratings, the group’s lowest. CSPI considers rebiana, a natural high-potency sweetener obtained from stevia, to be “safe,” though deserving of better testing.

“Sucralose may prove to be safer than saccharin, aspartame, and acesulfame potassium, but the forthcoming Italian study warrants careful scrutiny before we can be confident that the sweetener is safe for use in food,” said CSPI executive director Michael F. Jacobson.

Despite its concerns about the risk posed by artificial sweeteners, CSPI says consumers who drink soda are still probably better off drinking diet soda than sugar-sweetened soda, which poses the greater and demonstrable risks of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, gout, tooth decay, and other health problems. Soft drinks—diet or regular—often contain questionable food dyes and so-called caramel coloring that is contaminated with cancer-causing 4-methylimidazole. To avoid the risks of both sugars and non-caloric sweeteners, CSPI urges people to switch to water, seltzer water, flavored unsweetened waters, seltzer mixed with some fruit juice, or unsweetened iced tea.

CSPI has also made new entries in Chemical Cuisine for some other natural, high-potency sweeteners that aren’t widely used yet but are on the horizon. Monkfruit extract, used in some foods, contain substances called mogrosides that are about 200 times sweeter than sugar, but with an aftertaste described as licorice-like. Monkfruit, also known as Luo Han Guo and Lo Han Kuo, has been used as food in China for several hundred years. Monatin is a plant-based sweeter derived from the root of a shrub found in South Africa that is supposedly some 3,000 times sweeter than sugar. Those two sweeteners might also prove to be safe, but CSPI gives them a “caution” rating on the basis of inadequate testing.

Chemical Cuisine includes much more than sweeteners. While most of the additives will be disclosed on ingredients lists, some will not. Transglutaminase is a naturally occurring enzyme that’s presumably safe on its own. Known informally as “meat glue,” the enzyme lets chefs or manufacturers fuse together inexpensive cuts of beef into the distinctive shape of more expensive filet mignon. Besides cheating consumers, that practice can result in a less-safe steak since bacteria ordinarily confined to the surface of the steak are driven into the interior.

Castoreum is a rarely used additive that CSPI, as well as the Food and Drug Administration, assume to be safe. Any food manufacturer that actually uses it will likely list it among “natural flavorings” on ingredient lists and not disclose where castoreum actually comes from: the anal castor sacs of beavers.

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Manning Wellness Clinic  2702 McKinney Ave, s. 202   Dallas, TX 75204

214-720-2225  www.manningwellness.com

Manning Wellness Clinic is a top-rated comprehensive chiropractic clinic servicing

Uptown, downtown, Park Cities and the Oak Lawn areas of Dallas.

 

Chiropractic for Cancer Patients

Note from Dr. Manning: I believe strongly that cancer patients benefit from chiropractic care. Chiropractic can help to alleviate pain and discomfort; assist with the absorption of medication; and allow your body to function more efficiently,  therefore strengthening your body’s ability to fight disease.  Chiropractic can not cure cancer, but it can help in a patient’s battle with the effects of this insidious illness. If you or a family member are fighting cancer, please schedule a time to speak to me personally.  http://manningwellness.com/schedule-a-free-consultation/

Cancer Treatment Centers of America Highlighted in ACA News Cover Story

Groundbreaking, Integrated Approach to Treatment Demonstrates Commitment to Patient-centered Care

Arlington, Va.—The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) today announced that Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA)—a pioneer in integrative care, incorporating chiropractic services and other supportive therapies into its advanced, evidenced-based cancer treatments—is the focus of the cover story in the August 2013 issue of ACA News.

At CTCA’s five regional hospitals, chiropractic physicians work on teams alongside surgeons and oncologists to support cancer patients during their treatment. Its patient-centered approach came from a simple question, “If your mother had cancer, how would you want her to be treated?” CTCA’s founder, Richard J. Stephenson, lost his mother to cancer and wished that her treatment had been more focused on providing comprehensive care in addition to the advanced treatment options she needed.

Chiropractic physicians joined CTCA’s staff 10 years ago (due to patient demand), allowing its hospitals to offer truly comprehensive, integrated treatment under one roof. If a patient complains about a headache due to a new chemotherapy drug, his or her treatment team might first suggest the patient try a chiropractic adjustment as opposed to going on yet another medication.

According to Jeffrey Sklar, DC, eastern regional director in the department of chiropractic at CTCA, “We are not treating cancer, we are treating patients with cancer; it is whole-person care. And that is what got me turned on about chiropractic to begin with.”

CTCA’s model has influenced the way oncologists, surgeons and other clinicians around the country think about treating cancer patients. Whole-person cancer treatment combined with a compassionate, nurturing environment—known as the Mother Standard of Care—provides patients with much needed support during treatment.

“I applaud CTCA as an institution for its dedication to treating the whole patient by offering therapy aimed at combating the difficult side-effects of grueling cancer treatments, as well as the cancer itself,” said ACA President Keith Overland, DC. “I am truly inspired by my colleagues at CTCA, who are making a real difference in the quality of life for people undergoing cancer treatment.”

The August 2013 issue of ACA News, featuring more on chiropractic’s role in supporting patients at CTCA, and CTCA’s important support for the chiropractic profession and partnership with ACA, is available on ACA’s website. ACA News is the association’s flagship publication.

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA), celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2013, is the largest professional association in the United States representing doctors of chiropractic. ACA promotes the highest standards of patient care and professional ethics, and supports research that contributes to the health and well-being of millions of chiropractic patients. Visitwww.acatoday.org.  

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A Popular Myth about Running Injuries

By Gretchen Reynolds:

Almost everyone who runs (or has shopped for running shoes) has heard that how your foot pronates, or rolls inward, as you land affects your injury risk. Pronate too much or too little, conventional wisdom tells us, and you’ll wind up hurt. But a provocative new study shows that this deeply entrenched belief is probably wrong and that there is still a great deal we don’t understand about pronation and why the foot rolls as it does.

13120162-runner-woman-running-on-mountain-road-in-beautiful-nature-asian-female-sport-fitness-model-jogging-tFor the new study, published online this month in The British Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark and other institutions began by advertising in Danish newspapers and at gyms to find men and women who didn’t run but were game to try.

Recruiting novice runners for studies of injury risk is somewhat unusual. More typically, researchers rely on surveys of experienced runners, since those are, after all, the people who develop running injuries. By asking them about themselves, their training, their bodies and how they became injured, researchers have gained valuable insights into why runners get hurt.

But such studies have limitations. They rely on people’s notoriously leaky memories, instead of controlled experiments. And because experienced longtime runners often have a history of injuries, and one injury frequently contributes to the next, it can be difficult to tease out the original primary risk factor.

So the Danish researchers turned to running newcomers, who would provide, in effect, a blank injury slate. They eventually settled on 927 healthy adults, an impressively large group by exercise-science standards. The volunteers, men and women, ranged in age from 18 to 65.

Then, using elaborate measurements and visual evaluations, the researchers profiled each volunteer’s foot, to determine how he or she pronated.

Pronation, of course, is natural and desirable during running. When your foot flattens and rolls inward as you strike the ground — that is, when it pronates — it absorbs some of the forces generated by the impact of landing.

But it has long been thought that pronating too much or too little leads to a heightened risk of injuries to the leg or hip.

Determining exactly how much any given person pronates while in motion, however, is not easy. In very broad terms, flatter feet are associated with more pronation and higher-arched feet with less. But in this study, the researchers went beyond those simple guidelines and created what is known as a foot posture profile for each runner.

Using a widely accepted foot classification system, they divided the volunteers into those with neutral pronation, overpronation, severe overpronation, underpronation or severe underpronation.

Then they gave all of the volunteers the same model of lightweight, neutral running shoes (rather than motion-control shoes, which are designed to correct pronation problems), along with a GPS watch to track their mileage and instructions to report any injury, which would then be assessed by medical personnel.

The volunteers subsequently ran as much as they wished at a self-chosen pace for a full year. As a whole, the group covered more than 203,000 miles and developed about 300 medically confirmed injuries.

Contrary to received running wisdom, however, those who overpronated or underpronated were not significantly more likely to get hurt than runners with neutral foot motion.

Among those who covered at least 600 miles during the year, injury rates in fact were slightly higher among the runners with neutral feet than among those who overpronated.

This result confirms those of several earlier experiments showing that when runners choose their shoes based on their foot type — when overpronators wear motion-control shoes, for instance, to reduce how much they pronate — they sustain injuries at the same rate or at higher rates than when they choose shoes at random.

In essence, what these findings suggest, says Rasmus Ostergaard Nielsen, a doctoral researcher at Aarhus University who led the new study, is that supposedly deviant degrees of pronation may not in practice be abnormal and do not contribute to injuries.

And if that is the case, he continues, runners, especially those new to the activity, probably do not need to obsess about their foot type. Instead, he says, they could more profitably “pay attention to things like body mass, training, behavior, age and previous injury in order to prevent running-related injuries.”

Other researchers agree. “This is an excellent study,” says Bryan Heiderscheit, an associate professor of biomechanics and director of the running clinic at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. The research reinforces a widespread belief among scientists studying running “that pronation doesn’t play much of a role” in injury risk, he says.

It also suggests, he says, that trying to alter pronation with a specific type of shoe is probably misguided. At the university’s running clinic, “we see so many injured runners who’ve been told that they overpronate” and need sturdy motion-control shoes to fix the problem. “They wind up injured anyway.”

Instead, he says, this new study and common sense suggest that comfort is likely to be a better guide to shoe choice than foot posture. “We don’t know” whether anyone’s given degree of pronation needs to be altered, he says. “We do know that comfort helps” to make running tolerable. But when he asks injured runners at the clinic whether their current shoes are comfortable, “it’s amazing,” he says, “how many say no.”

 (Reprinted from the New York Times)
Top rated Dallas chiropractor Dr. Jeff Manning can help diagnose and alleviate pain and discomfort you may experience after exercising, especially after running. An expert in the use of kinesiotaping, Dr. Manning has helped many patients–from novice athletes to marathoners–with non-invasive procedure designed to help the body help itself.

JAMA suggests Chiropractic before Surgery for Back Pain

jeff's office 006

Chiropractic Physicians Provide Natural Alternatives for Pain Treatment, Injury Prevention

May 8, 2013, Arlington, Va.—An article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggests patients try chiropractic services for the treatment of low back pain. According to the article, surgery is not usually needed and should only be considered if more conservative therapies fail. The information in JAMA reinforces the American Chiropractic Association’s (ACA) position that conservative care options should serve as a first line of defense against pain.

The article, part of JAMA’s Patient Page public education series, explains that the back is made up of bones, nerves, muscles and other soft tissues such as ligaments and tendons that support posture and give the body flexibility. Back pain can be caused by problems with any of the structures in the back.

As neuromusculoskeletal experts, chiropractic physicians are particularly well suited to manage and help prevent low back pain.

“We are encouraged to see JAMA suggest patients try chiropractic and other more conservative types of treatment for their back pain. In many cases pain can be alleviated without the use of unnecessary drugs or surgery, so it makes sense to exhaust conservative options first,” said ACA President Keith Overland, DC.

“Research confirms that the services provided by chiropractic physicians are not only clinically effective but also cost-effective, so taking a more conservative approach at the onset of low back pain can also potentially save both patients and the health care system money down the line,” he added.

For those who are currently pain-free, the exercise tips, posture recommendations and guidance on injury prevention routinely provided by chiropractic physicians can help people maintain a healthy back throughout their lives. To learn more, contact Dr. Jeff Manning for a FREE PHONE CONSULTATION at Manning Wellness Clinic

Manning Wellness Clinic

2702 McKinney Avenue, suite 202

Dallas, TX 75204

214-720-2225

www.manningwellness.com

A Better Mac and Cheese recipe

To post information about the questionable additives in Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, and suggest that you try to cut down or eliminate eating it, leaves a void for many mac-n-cheese loving folks…our children included. The following recipe, though not flavored or colored like the well-known blue box, definitely fits the bill when you’re craving some comfort food. And it is EASY!! Our kids love it, as do their friends.

A Better Mac and Cheese

mac and cheese

1  1/2 cups cottage cheese

1 1/2 cups skim milk (1 or 2% is ok too)

1 tsp dried mustard or 1 Tbl prepared mustard

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1/2 tsp salt (cottage cheese has a high sodium content so you can omit this)

1/2 tsp ground pepper

1/4 cup grated onions (you can sub with 2 T chopped dried onion)

1 cup plus extra grated sharp cheddar cheese

1/2 lb uncooked whole wheat macaroni

2 Tbl grated parmesan cheese

1/4 cup bread crumbs

Directions: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Prepare a 9 or 10″ square baking pan with a light  coating of cooking spray. In a blender, combine the cottage cheese, milk, mustard, nutmeg, salt and pepper and purée until smooth. In a large bowl combine the puréed mixture with the onions, cheddar cheese, and uncooked macaroni. Stir well. Pour the macaroni and cheese mixture into the baking pan. Combine the grated Parmesan cheese and breadcrumbs and sprinkle evenly over the top. Bake for about 45 minutes until the topping is browned and the center is firm.

 

Is It Better to Walk or Run?

Walking and running are the most popular physical activities for American adults. But whether one is preferable to the other in terms of improving health has long been debated. Now a variety of new studies that pitted running directly against walking are providing some answers. Their conclusion? It depends almost completely on what you are hoping to accomplish.

If, for instance, you are looking to control your weight — and shallowly or not, I am — running wins, going away. In a study published last month in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, and unambiguously titled “Greater Weight Loss From Running than Walking,” researchers combed survey data from 15,237 walkers and 32,215 runners enrolled in the National Runners and Walkers Health Study — a large survey being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif.

Participants were asked about their weight, waist circumference, diets and typical weekly walking or running mileage both when they joined the study, and then again up to six years later.

The runners almost uniformly were thinner than the walkers when each joined the study. And they stayed that way throughout. Over the years, the runners maintained their body mass and waistlines far better than the walkers.

The difference was particularly notable among participants over 55. Runners in this age group were not running a lot and generally were barely expending more calories per week during exercise than older walkers. But their body mass indexes and waist circumferences remained significantly lower than those of age-matched walkers.

Why running should better aid weight management than walking is not altogether clear. It might seem obvious that running, being more strenuous then walking, burns more calories per hour. And that’s true. But in the Berkeley study and others, when energy expenditure was approximately matched — when walkers head out for hours of rambling and burn the same number of calories over the course of a week as runners — the runners seem able to control their weight better over the long term.

One reason may be running’s effect on appetite, as another intriguing, if small, study suggests. In the study, published last year in the Journal of Obesity, nine experienced female runners and 10 committed female walkers reported to the exercise physiology lab at the University of Wyoming on two separate occasions. On one day, the groups ran or walked on a treadmill for an hour. On the second day, they all rested for an hour. Throughout each session, researchers monitored their total energy expenditure. They also drew blood from their volunteers to check for levels of certain hormones related to appetite.

After both sessions, the volunteers were set free in a room with a laden buffet and told to eat at will.

The walkers turned out to be hungry, consuming about 50 calories more than they had burned during their hourlong treadmill stroll.

The runners, on the other hand, picked at their food, taking in almost 200 calories less than they had burned while running.

The runners also proved after exercise to have significantly higher blood levels of a hormone called peptide YY, which has been shown to suppress appetite. The walkers did not have increased peptide YY levels; their appetites remained hearty.

So to eat less, run first.

But on other measures of health, new science shows that walking can be at least as valuable as running — and in some instances, more so. A study published this month that again plumbed data from the Runners and Walkers Health Study found that both runners and walkers had equally diminished risks of developing age-related cataracts compared to sedentary people, an unexpected but excellent benefit of exercise.

And in perhaps the most comforting of the new studies, published last month in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and again using numbers from the versatile Runners and Walkers Health Study, runners had far less risk of high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol profiles, diabetes and heart disease than their sedentary peers. But the walkers were doing even better. Runners, for instance, reduced their risk of heart disease by about 4.5 percent if they ran an hour a day. Walkers who expended the same amount of energy per day reduced their risk of heart disease by more than 9 percent.

Of course, few walkers match the energy expenditure of runners. “It’s fair to say that, if you plan to expend the same energy walking as running, you have to walk about one and a half times as far and that it takes about twice as long,” said Paul T. Williams, a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories and the lead author of all of the studies involving the surveys of runners and walkers.

On the other hand, people who begin walking are often more unhealthy than those who start running, and so their health benefits from the exercise can be commensurately greater.

“It bears repeating that either walking or running is healthier than not doing either,” Dr. Williams said, whatever your health goals.

For confirmation, consider one additional aspect of the appetite study. The volunteers in that experiment had sat quietly for an hour during one session, not exercising in any fashion, neither running nor walking. And afterward they were famished, consuming about 300 calories more than the meager few they had just burned.